Preparation Guide for your Newborn

Mummies to-be, are you hearing not-so-great stories about breaking rest and a million diaper changes? It really isn’t that bad – if you are well prepared! So read up – here’s everything you need to know about preparing for junior.

It is true that a newborn is a lot of work. Although every single minute you spend with your precious little angel is well worth it!

So enjoy those first few month of their lives, as time just wizzes past and they will be toddlers before you know it! Here’s a guide on how to prepare for your newborn.

Sleep whenever you can!

Starting from your last trimester, try to go to bed early and take naps whenever you can. This will ensure you have enough energy for the delivery – which could be anytime soon!

Even in the first few weeks after your baby’s arrival sleep whenever you can. Put someone else in charge of the housework. At this crucial time, delegation is key.

Your top priority at the moment is recuperating and taking care of your newborn – spending time bonding, feeding and changing him. You should also take care of yourself by eating nutritious meals – especially if you are nursing your baby.

Early preparation can save you time and energy

Around your 37th week of pregnancy, make sure all the baby’s items are organized in the baby’s room. Diapers and wet wipes should be within reach. All those cute baby clothes should be freshly washed and kept near the changing table.

In the early weeks, your baby will require many changes throughout the day due to spit-ups, diaper leakage and even spurting of milk from your newly upsized breasts. So a well – organized room will be a blessing at moments like this.

Discuss your parenting style with your spouse

It is a good idea to sit down with your partner during your late pregnancy to discuss parenting strategies and what your parenting style would be.

This is a great way to plan ahead for situations that may pop up after junior arrives and avoid minor misunderstandings with your spouse and relatives. Discuss feeding options, diaper vs nappy options, sleep options and everything in between.

Write down a ‘plan’ for easy reference later-on. Your plan could include:

  • Contact details of your chosen paediatrician.
  • An emergency contact if you are unable to cope. This would usually be a close friend who is also a parent, or your own parent.
  • A plan for ‘time out’ for when both parents feel overwhelmed by the new duties.
  • A roster for both parents. For example: Daddy can do the laundry while Mummy feeds and changes baby.
  • Methods to let Mummy rest and recuperate. For example: Daddy can take a week off work immediately after the birth to help out, or Daddy can watch the baby over the weekends while Mummy sleeps in.
  • Coping methods when the baby refuses to sleep and/or cries constantly.
  • If applicable, who should help take care of the older children in the family.
  • It would also be wise to make arrangements for the baby’s first month party in your late pregnancy by calling different companies to ask for quotes and to clarify details.

Teamwork is the key to success

It took two people to make the baby, so it is only fair for both partners to take on the tasks of parenting. Daddy cannot obviously breastfeed, but he can still help in many other useful ways like rocking the baby to sleep, taking over the house chores, preparing simple meals and changing the baby.

A new mother would sometimes feel uncomfortable about her new body and the recent changes in her breasts and she probably would be experiencing pains and aches all over.

So she will need her caring and loving husband by her side now more than ever.

We hope this information will help you be better prepared for your new role as parents!